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Walking in someone else’s shoes

dedicated to raising awareness of Myasthenia Gravis.

Many of us have heard the expression, “Before you judge, walk a mile in another man’s shoes.” Those words might apply here.

Back in June, when I first posted How Myasthenia Gravis Feels, I wondered if anyone would want to try this little exercise? I never added it to that page. So here, two months later, we have it. Maybe you can experience a little of how it might feel being the one with MG.

Spend thirty minutes walking in my shoes.

If we can walk in someone else’s shoes for a period of time, we sometimes will come to understand them with compassion and patience.

So, do you want to try that? …just for thirty minutes … turn on a timer after you are set up! Here you go.

Put masking tape, or a patch of some kind, over one eye so it will not open and so you cannot see out of that eye. It only has to hold for thirty minutes. If possible, tape the other eye half way shut. You will see out of it, but not clearly.

Now, continue with what you were doing…cooking, perhaps, or reading or shopping? Carry on with life knowing you cannot change the eye’s ability to stay open, so you accept it. After you rest your eyes for an undetermined period, the eyelids may open on their own.

This may be all some with MG experience at first. For others, this disability may come on later during their time with the disease. For me, my sight began to blur and my eyelids began to droop five years after onset of the disease, but prior to diagnosis.

If you wish, while the eyes are taped, tie one hand behind your back. Consider your physical capabilities are curtailed by weakness and all you can use is one arm and hand. A book is too heavy to pick up, an empty shoulder bag may seem too heavy to carry.

How will you feel asking someone to help you do tasks you want or need to do?
How will you feel admitting you can’t do the things you know others can do all the time. MG can impact in psychological as well as physical ways. I imagine you might become exhausted doing what you were formerly doing before the thirty minutes began. You might feel a need to rest. Carry on.

After thirty minutes, remove the tape from your eyes and untie your arm.

The difference, of course, is those with MG cannot remove the tape from their eyes or untie their arms or legs. Their weakness goes on, and on, and on, hopefully with periods of rest between.

You have just experienced a similar sensation to MG. Of course, it cannot be the identical feeling, but you might now understand how those with involuntary weakness are struggling, day after day, to do what many others take for granted, without a first or second thought.

My wish is that this wee exercise might help those who want to know, develop a compassion for those with diseases, who might seem different in some way, for those who, not by choice, are living in situations unlike their own. I hope you notice a connection evolves when we try to “walk in someone else’s shoes, ” an empathy that helps us relate to one another in the family of humans.
Thank you taking the time to walk in my shoes. ❤️

If you found titles in the list in the right column that might increase your MG knowledge, take time to read them now. If you know someone who might benefit from reading or learning from the awareness topics on this site, don’t miss an opportunity to give/send them the blog site link, Myasthenia-Gravis-Insights.com. Thank you for being part of raising awareness of Myasthenia Gravis.


Walking in someone else’s shoes (c) 2021 Judith Allen Shone

Art:
Butterfies 1,2. Tatiana Mitrushiva @Mitrushova on etsy
Butterfly 3. Image by JL G from Pixabay

Recap of Myasthenia Gravis

dedicated to raising awareness of Myasthenia Gravis.

We have been talking a lot about myasthenia gravis!

What have we learned?

Thank you for becoming aware of MG!

We have explored the rare, chronic autoimmune neuromuscular disorder called myasthenia gravis with the intention of raising awareness.

Maybe this recap will help refresh what we’ve read in the posts, listed in right side column.

So, what have we learned?

The main focus throughout the month was to tell one person one thing that we learned about myasthenia gravis. …there will always be time to learn and share about this debilitating disease!

Recap of Myasthenia Gravis Awareness Month
– in order of appearance –

June has provided us with an opportunity to raise awareness of myasthenia gravis, but we can now continue to learn and research and study and understand this debilitating disease, which most times comes by surprise and stays for a lifetime.

Awareness

Getting us started, we learned that in 2020, there were an estimated 500,000-700,000 cases of myasthenia gravis worldwide, with the frequency number used 20/100,000 of population, per Medlineplus.gov. While it may be rare, for those diagnosed with it, MG is life changing —forever.


Click to read more

Children can read about MG

I am so glad Jenny Coffey wrote (and illustrated) I’m Still Me: My Life with MG about her childhood “adventure” with MG. I find the perspective so positive, so filled with optimism, a tone that will transfer when reading to children, as well as when children read to themselves.


Tell One Person about MG

Tell one person, start a ripple about myasthenia gravis. Say it:
my-us-THEE-nee-uh GRAV-is, (GRAY-vis) – myasthenia gravis.

Your words will expand and an awakening will begin…those ripples will become waves of knowledge and an ‘aha’ moment for someone.

That’s what awareness can do!


Our Myasthenia Gravis story counts.

Are you a caregiver, a patient, a physician, or anyone who has had an experience in the world of myasthenia gravis? Consider sharing few moments, perhaps a few paragraphs, from a true story, a comment about a situation, an episode that was not expected…something that could help someone else. Something we all can learn from. Send by email and we will post it.


A Story from one with MG

For those who are ready to learn more, today’s featured article by Rebekah Dorr offers a description of Myasthenia Gravis that reads like a picture. Herself an MG patient since 2011, Rebekah is amazingly passionate about caring about those with MG. She shares information and communicates to encourage them through her Myasthenia Gravis Unmasked Facebook site.

Read Rebekah’s story on this page. An incredible lady!


MG Symptoms to recognize

Among symptoms most frequently associated with myasthenia gravis are drooping eyelids, double vision, weak arm and leg muscles, difficulty chewing, and shortness of breath.

This is not an exhaustive list, but review it on the page where far more are listed. Speaking with many patients, they would confirm these as ‘early symptoms.’


Myths we might hear

Remember, this is true: Myasthenia Gravis is a rare, very complex, disease and there are other diseases that mimic part of it. Therefore, it may take time for conclusive diagnosis! But having good symptom experiences to report is helpful to physicians so they can avoid referencing myths—that are likely not true, such as:

  • MG has no pain
  • Only growing pains
  • Inflamed knees
  • Everyone gets tired
  • Just wants attention
  • Exercise will make it better

Myasthenia Gravis terminology

When talking about myasthenia gravis it helps to know the vocabulary, the terms used by others, the words recognized by doctors that trigger their thinking in certain ways.

We can contribute to our own health through understanding if we are somewhat aware of what words mean.


How myasthenia gravis feels

…It is a bizarre feeling to be normal one moment and within seconds you feel your body has rejected you. Yet, in a way, it has. The muscles do not get the message from the brain and the effort to try to move anyway is too fatiguing….


Who might get MG

The disease seems to be able to strike anyone at any age, including children. MG is more frequently seen in women aged 20 to 30, and men aged 50 and older. Men over 60 and women under 40 are at higher risk.


Myasthenic crisis

Myasthenic crisis is an emergency.

Myasthenic crisis happens when the respiratory muscles become too weak to move enough air in and out of the lungs. An emergency situation exists. Such a situation could necessitate a ventilator to help with breathing.


Myasthenia Gravis flareups

Flares.

An important possible behavior experienced by those with myasthenia gravis is a flareup… “…often an acute, temporary worsening or increase of symptoms…”


Causes of Myasthenia Gravis

Cause? Hereditary? Can MG get worse?

Myasthenia gravis is inconsistent, called the ‘snowflake disease,’ different with each person, not to mention the overlap in symptoms with other diseases, making it hard to diagnose. Keep checking with the numerous websites to add to your knowledge.


Prepare for appointment

Listen when Myasthenia Gravis speaks.’

Prepare for your doctor appointment with meaningful data to be able to be your own advocate as much as possible.


LOOKING FOR THE COMMENT SECTIONS? Click titles of blog articles or list on right side and you will go to each post separately, where comment section is at the bottom. Thank you.


!! This is an awareness site only. !!
No diagnosis or treatment suggestions. Mainly, it is support and links for those who are searching for ‘why they have weak muscles.’


Watch our right side bar to see most recent posts about many aspects of Myasthenia Gravis.

Please, SHARE THIS SITE ...
others can learn by reading what you have discovered… a site solely for awareness of Myasthenia Gravis.

Want to walk for,
or donate Canada to,
Myasthenia Gravis Society of Canada?
Visit Step Up for MG Fit or Press Release


Recap of Myasthenia Gravis © 2021 Judith Allen Shone

Prepare for doctor visit

Suggestions for preparing for doctor visit about weak muscles.

dedicated to raising awareness of Myasthenia Gravis.

Myasthenia Gravis (MG) is a rare, chronic, autoimmune neuromuscular disorder. Approximately 700,000 cases have been reported worldwide, with between 70,000 to 90,000 in North America. There are many with muscle weakness who are not included in reports because they remain undiagnosed, still in that long stretch of evaluation. This information is to help all of them.

Symptoms need to be assessed and confirmed by a qualified professional physician, a specialist, usually a neurologist, familiar with the disease.

Although you may have been searching for ‘why you have weak muscles‘ for a long time…for some of us it has taken years to get a diagnosis, while some have been luckier…when you find the right doctor, it still takes time for consultations, for testing, for evaluations.

The more helpful we can be for those who want to help us, the more likely we will get results.


Listen when Myasthenia Gravis speaks.

Prepare for your doctor appointment with meaningful data to be able to be your own advocate as much as possible

  1. Keep a journal

With clarity and precision, take notes in your journal. Use minimum of 8-10 columns:

  • All comments have a part to play in accurate diagnosis. Be as detailed as possible.
  • List your symptoms each day, or when they occur.
  • Note when these **behaviors happen— when you are reading, eating, drinking, driving, working, talking, exercising, sleeping, doing daily chores or tasks, (vacuuming, preparing meals, etc) getting around, or during personal grooming, or situation you can define.
  • Indicate where this happened
  • Notice what else is going on…Note activity limitations created by the symptoms…(physical>weak legs=can’t run anymore, etc. or psychological>weak legs=can’t run=depression, emotional burdens etc.)
  • Note also environments, situations, weather and temperatures, as well as the physical behaviors,
  • Note how you cope with each behavior
  • Keep track of how symptoms change over time
  • How long did the behavior last…minutes, hours days
  • Add related/meaningful photographs, videos or audio segments.

** Make note if the symptoms seem to be related to behaviors or unrelated to activity, circumstances or outside influences. You don’t know what your symptoms represent until a doctor evaluates during the search for a diagnosis.


  • 2. Use these muscle areas to relate to possible behaviors. Include related information in your journal.
  • How do the muscles associated with eyes react? Droop? Blur?
  • Do you notice facial appearance affected by weak muscles?
  • Do you have difficulty breathing of chewing?
  • Do you experience choking?
  • Do you have trouble swallowing?
  • Do you have difficulty supporting your neck?
  • Do you have trouble breathing at rest or during physical activity?
  • Do you notice weakness in your arms or legs?
  • Do you get tired or feel fatigued easily…sometimes, frequently?
  • Do you have trouble lifting objects?
  • Do you have trouble running, walking or standing?
  • 3. Annotate – Verbal illustrations help

In addition, if you can, annotate events, tell the story of how your muscles were affected, how your life was impacted. Demonstrate through specific words, not just data, what happened.
“I had to hold on to the railing to pull myself up the stairs. My legs would not lift me otherwise.”
“I could not walk that far, so I rested, leaning on the wall. I could not take another step.”
“I could not run. My legs would not move. When I tried to run, they collapsed under me and I dropped to the ground.”
“I could not go down the stairs because there was nothing to hold on to. I was afraid I would fall.”
” I needed help stepping up onto the curb. My foot seemed heavy and my leg would not lift it up.”
“I couldn’t read the sign because of the blurry, double-vision of the words. I closed one eye and it helped a bit.”
“I tried to say the words, but they slurred as if I had been drinking. I could not seem to correct the slurring.”
“I tried to carry the plate, but I could not lift it very far off the table. I had to put it down so it would not drop from my hands.”

As you fill in the notations, leave room after each item to add notes later if you wish. The more information you collect, the better the chances for diagnosis.

  • 5. Before diagnosis, make a ‘Q4Dr’ list

IMPORTANT Invite input from caregivers or family or friends to give perspectives those of us with MG might overlook.

  • From your symptom list, write down questions on your ‘questions for doctor’ list (Q4Dr) that feel unanswered.
  • Read through FAQs on websites that you feel drawn to. (example: Conquer MG) There are many more sites with questions; if you think they apply and you need an answer, write the question on your ‘Q4Dr’ list.

Once you have found:

  • a doctor who listens,
  • a doctor you feel understands you,
  • a doctor who respects what you say and believes you,
  • a doctor with whom you feel comfortable moving forward,

    then I suggest proceeding as a team to resolve your diagnosis.
  • 6. Once diagnosed, continue to gather information

The more helpful we can be for those who want to help us, the more likely we will get results. Doctors may ask us not to go online for information. But we know searching for information helps us BE OUR OWN ADVOCATE…most times, no one can do it better!

My experiences tell me NOT everything I read about MG applies to me. In fact, most articles do not, and many are beyond my understanding.

But as my own advocate, I promote:

  • DO read MG websites
  • DO subscribe to MG newsletters
  • DO read comments in, and if you wish, participate in, social media, zoom, or in-person support groups
  • DO gather information and ask questions
  • DO connect personally with the organization nearest you so you can talk, email or communicate with others in similar situations.

    Some of the folks on the MG sites are medical personnel with qualified backgrounds and knowledge to write extensively. Check that out.

    Remember, those who write stories, make social media comments, or provide awareness sites, may not be medically qualified, but are the ones who have experiences to relate -any of them might bring up questions in your mind…write your questions down. Your doctor will be the one to resolve those questions with you.
  • Remember, YOUR EXPERIENCE IS THE ONE THAT COUNTS. It is your body, you can best ‘feel’ what is right for you. If the doctor and you do not click on issues, find another doctor.

It may end up that the information you discover is more
for your understanding …share it or not, have it ready.

Prepare the information. By doing so, you are learning and keeping the information top of mind. At the appointment, let it be known that you have the information. It may not be needed. But notating what you have been through and the associated details will allow you to have a more meaningful conversation.

Listen…respond… Listen…respond.
We learn more by listening…but doctors do need to know our symptoms. Ask when you should present your information. Ask questions when you need clarification. Be aware that one visit may not be enough to find an answer…but it is a beginning. Work together with your doctor to find what symptoms mean, what disorders might be suggested.


LOOKING FOR THE COMMENT SECTIONS? Click titles of blog articles and you will go to each post separately, where comment section is at the bottom. Thank you.

Watch our right side bar to see most recent posts about many aspects of Myasthenia Gravis.

Please, SHARE THIS SITE ...
others can learn by reading what you have discovered… a site solely for awareness of Myasthenia Gravis.


Prepare for doctor visit (c) 2021 Judith Allen Shone

Iris represent wisdom and hope

Iris image combination from MitrushovaClipArt and ElenazlataArtDesign

Causes of Myasthenia Gravis

dedicated to raising awareness of Myasthenia Gravis.

Today, let’s learn causes of MG
and what can cause MG to get worse

So we have learned the name myasthenia gravis, how to say it, common symptoms, related terms, learned some myths, how MG feels, who might get MG, and what a crisis is. Now, let’s learn causes.

Cause?

The National Organization for Rare Diseases (NORD) website states amid their extensive section on causes: Myasthenia gravis is caused by an abnormal immune reaction (antibody-mediated autoimmune response) in which the body’s immune defenses (i.e., antibodies) inappropriately attack certain proteins in muscles that receive nerve impulses.

The NORD site also indicates: “…the disorder [MG] appears to occur spontaneously (sporadically) for unknown reasons.”

A cause of MG is complex, and requires the evaluation of a professional health care specialist. If myasthenia gravis has begun to ring a bell as a possible disorder for discussion with your doctor, these links to sites that give far more discussion about ’causes’ might add to your convictions, either way. They are a places to begin.

Causes/Inheritance – MDA
Myasthenia Gravis causes – MGN
What causes MG? –Conquer MG
What causes myasthenia gravis? – NIH


Hereditary?

The Muscular Dystrophy Association website relates that “although MG and other autoimmune diseases are not hereditary, genetic susceptibility does appear to play a role. It seems likely that genetic factors also contribute to the pathogenesis of MG.”


“The U.S. National Library of Medicine website relates: “In most cases, myasthenia gravis is not inherited and occurs in people with no history of the disorder in their family. About 3 to 5 percent of affected individuals have other family members with myasthenia gravis or other autoimmune disorders, but the inheritance pattern is unknown.”


Myasthenia gravis is inconsistent, called the ‘snowflake disease,’ different with each person, not to mention the overlap in symptoms with other diseases, making it hard to diagnose. Keep checking with the numerous websites to add to your knowledge.

And then sometimes I even forget I have MG until the symptoms raise their head and I remember, “ooh, yes, I have trouble walking. What triggered that?”


What can cause MG to get worse?

There are instances where triggers make MG worse. It is worth researching more than what is here because not all instances relate to every case of MG. Keep your list of what relates to you! Let your doctor know.

  • We know fatigue makes our muscles weaker, but lack of sleep apparently can add to the fatigue as well.
  • As with many illness, stress is named as a trigger for MG fatigue.
  • Humidity has been a serious trigger for me and is on the list of what to monitor.
  • Bright sunlight and extreme temperatures; hot, with humidity, saunas, sunbathing, hot baths or hot showers or hot tubs, or cold.
  • One thing that still triggers drooping eyelids for me is flashing of strobe lights. It is worse with mullti-colored lights, used with a disco ball with mirrors.
  • Exposure to any number of chemicals for lawns, housekeeping or insect sprays. Note which ones and talk to your doctor.
  • Pain and illness can bring on fatigue.

Want to walk for,
or donate Canada to,
Myasthenia Gravis Society of Canada?
Visit Step Up for MG Fit or Press Release

** This site is not associated with the MG groups mentioned on this site. We just know MG research cannot go forward without donations/funding.


Watch our right side bar to see most recent posts about many aspects of Myasthenia Gravis.

Having these symptoms does not mean you have MG, but they might be an indicator for discussion with your doctor about symptoms.

I am so glad you have become part of the raising awareness campaign. As we learn more we are able to tell others.

LOOKING FOR THE COMMENT SECTIONS? Click titles of blog articles and you will go to each post separately, where comment section is at the bottom. Thank you.


Thank you…you make my heart sing!

Please, SHARE THIS SITE ...
others can learn by reading what you have discovered… a site solely for awareness of Myasthenia Gravis.


Six days – causes of MG © 2021 Judith Allen Shone

Iris and Peonies – EquinoxStudioArt
Lilacs and Forget-me-nots (original for book cover art)- Tatiana Mitrushova

Iris represent wisdom and hope


In support of this Myasthenia Gravis Insights website, I share my caregiver books. Thank you for checking them out!

For Alzheimer’s, Vascular Dementia, COPD and anxiety spouse-caregiving stories, browse these two books, Accepting the Gift of Caregiving series.

Available to order in paperback, eBook or hardcover from local booksellers, or
online from your favorite site, or Amazon, or Facebook shop or caregiver-books.

Are you in Halton area of Ontario?
Order from Ian at Different Drummer Books in Burlington.

Myasthenia Gravis flareups

dedicated to raising awareness of Myasthenia Gravis.

Flares

An important possible behavior experienced by those with myasthenia gravis is a flareup.

On June 22, 2021, Rebekah Dorr, on her open community Facebook page, Myasthenia Gravis Unmasked, wrote this about flares. She reminded me that flares were important to mention in Awareness Month.

Rebekah Dorr states:

“Flares are often acute, temporary worsening or increase of symptoms (can be a few specific ones or generalized). Flares can be caused by poor sleep, stress, weather and hormonal changes, medication changes (increase, decrease or discharged) etc.

“They can usually be managed at home with good communication with a skilled provider and what you have learned about your specific symptoms and presentation with time.

“However, respiratory involvement is another matter. Respiratory weakness with a flare should be considered an exacerbation which has the strong potential to lead to crisis and should be taken care of very carefully. Do not brush off this particular symptom. You may be able to manage at home if it’s more mild and you have supportive equipment or rescue meds (like a temporary boost in steroids or changes to mestinon as prescribed by your dr), but moderate and severe symptoms should always get checked out quickly.

“If you ever feel a flare or exacerbation is concerning you and in your gut you know something is wrong, don’t hesitate to get help.

“I know we face a whole lot of crap at the ER and hospitals. A lot of it. And we get scared to go. But I would rather we go and try and fight before it’s too late and we are being rushed in and intubated or worse.”

(c) 2021 Rebekah Dorr

I think it is important to note that, while everyone is different, the Outlook, found on Medical News Today:
“…people with MG can live a life without regular flareups as long as they stick to a regular treatment plan.”


Read more about Rebekah Dorr, and the post she shared here earlier this month, “What is Myasthenia Gravis?”, a pictorial description in words.

A patient since 2011, Rebekah is a passionate advocate for those with MG, who avails herself for those with questions by communicating on/monitoring her Facebook community site. Find out more about this amazing lady!


Again, having these symptoms does not mean you have MG, but they might be an indicator for discussion with your doctor.

Visit sites for Support

If you are searching for answers for ‘muscle weakness’ symptoms and have reason to believe you might want to talk to your doctor about myasthenia gravis, spend some time online reading comments others have shared. Visit Supporting One Another.


If you have access to Facebook and can find the site, Myasthenia Gravis Unmasked, it will be worth your time to browse through the immense volume of information there. There are noted nearly 15,000 followers— you will find you are not alone.

LOOKING FOR THE COMMENT SECTIONS? Click titles of blog articles and you will go to each post separately, where comment section is at the bottom. Thank you.

Watch our right side bar to see most recent posts about many aspects of Myasthenia Gravis.


Seven days – MG flareups (c) Judith Allen Shone

with (C) 2021 Rebekah Dorr her writeup on flares.



In support of the Myasthenia Gravis Insights website, and because I am still a 24/7 caregiver, I share my caregiver books. Thank you for checking them out! 🌞 You are my sunshine. ~Judith Allen Shone

For Alzheimer’s, Vascular Dementia, COPD and anxiety spouse-caregiving stories, learn about these two books, Accepting the Gift of Caregiving series.

Available to order in paperback, eBook or hardcover from local booksellers, or
online from your favorite site, or Amazon, or Facebook shop 
or caregiver-books. Or in Halton area of Ontario, order from:

Alzheimer Society Halton
4391 Harvester Rd
Burlington, Ontario
289-837-2310

A Different Drummer Books
513 Locust Street
Burlington, Ontario
905-639-0925
diffdrum@mac.com

Myasthenic crisis

dedicated to raising awareness of Myasthenia Gravis.

Myasthenic crisis occurs when the breathing capability is challenged by weakness of the respiratory muscles that help us breathe.

Myasthenic crisis is an emergency

Myasthenic crisis is characterized by worsening of muscle weakness, resulting in respiratory failure, a life-threatening condition.

Myasthenic crisis happens when the respiratory muscles become too weak to move enough air in and out of the lungs. An emergency situation exists. Such a situation could necessitate a ventilator to help with breathing.

If you are having trouble breathing, and you have myasthenia gravis, (or any other illness), call 911 or get to nearest ER, ask to notify your MG doctor, and advise ER staff specifically of your myasthenic crisis situation, to help them focus on your needs.

Doctors need to be familiar with myasthenia gravis to evaluate in more detail the needs of the patient with respect to the specific causes beyond ‘muscle weakness.’

Read more about myasthenic crisis – link to sites on What is Myasthenia Gravis? and Resource for MG pages.

As part of our campaign of awareness, we identify commonly recognized symptoms of myasthenia gravis. We speak of symptoms associated with myasthenia gravis, BUT the presence of any of these symptoms does not mean that anyone has a specific disorder. This site does not diagnose nor suggest diagnosis or treatment


Watch our right side bar to see most recent posts about many aspects of Myasthenia Gravis.


Want to walk for,
or donate in Canada to,
Myasthenia Gravis Society of Canada?
Visit Step Up for MG Fit or Press Release

COMING UP: Some causes of MG, and Suggestions on how to prepare for doctor visit will be discussed in upcoming posts in June.

LOOKING FOR THE COMMENT SECTIONS? Click titles of blog articles and you will go to each post separately, where comment section is at the bottom. Thank you.

Please, SHARE THIS SITE ...
others can learn by reading what you have discovered… a site solely for awareness of Myasthenia Gravis.


Nine days -an MG crisis (c) 2021 Judith Allen Shone

Iris represents wisdom and hope

Who might get Myasthenia Gravis

dedicated to raising awareness of Myasthenia Gravis.

The good news is that myasthenia gravis,a rare, chronic, autoimmune, neuromuscular disease, is most likely not going to appear in your body; that, statistically, you will never experience this disease.

But it does seem to appear spontaneously. Thus, the not-so-good news is that we cannot predict, we cannot plan, we cannot forecast which ones of us might get myasthenia gravis. Scientific studies have given us some common threads and markers to help doctors narrow down and categorize so they can diagnose a disease that has many symptoms and that shares a few symptoms with other diseases.

Who might get Myasthenia Gravis?

Myasthenia Gravis is generally known to affect any of the muscles that you control voluntarily, (eyes, mouth throat, limbs) as well as chest muscles, and the diaphragm, which is both a voluntary and involuntary muscle. Historically, the most common symptoms are drooping eyes, double vision, difficulty chewing, choking on food, and abnormal limb muscle weakness.

The Myasthenia Gravis Fact Sheet, (NINDS), of Apr. 27, 2020, relates:“Who gets myasthenia gravis? Myasthenia gravis affects both men and women and occurs across all racial and ethnic groups. It most commonly impacts young adult women (under 40) and older men (over 60), but it can occur at any age, including childhood. Myasthenia gravis is not inherited nor is it contagious.”

  • Myasthenia gravis is not contagious.
  • It is not inherited, although more than one case in a family has been seen.
  • People with MG, under treatment, can have a relatively normal quality of life with normal life expectancy.
  • There is no known cure.
  • The disease seems to be able to strike anyone at any age, including children. MG is more frequently seen in women aged 20 to 30, and men aged 50 and older. Men over 60 and women under 40 are at higher risk.
  • Risk factors for myasthenia gravis include having a personal or family history of autoimmune diseases.
  • MG occurs across all racial and ethnic groups

As part of our campaign of awareness, we identify commonly recognized symptoms of myasthenia gravis. We speak of symptoms associated with MG, but the presence of any of these symptoms does not mean that anyone has a specific disorder.

This site does not diagnose nor suggest diagnosis or treatment PLEASE, contact your health provider if you sense unknown symptoms of any kind. We suggest that you discuss symptoms with your personal doctor, your neurologist or your opthamologist.


LOOKING FOR THE COMMENT SECTIONS? Click titles of blog articles and you will go to each post separately, where comment section is at the bottom. Thank you.

Watch our right side bar to see most recent posts about many aspects of Myasthenia Gravis.

Please, SHARE THIS SITE ...
others can learn by reading what you have discovered… a site solely for awareness of Myasthenia Gravis.


Twelve days – who might get MG (c) 2021 Judith Allen Shone

Iris image by Tatiana Mitrushova


It is quite a life experience to be associated day-in, day-out with two serious, chronic, diseases: I have Myasthenia Gravis, in and out of remission, and my spouse has Alzheimer’s.

In support of the Myasthenia Gravis Insights website, and because I am still a 24/7 caregiver for my husband with memory loss, I share my caregiver books. Thank you for checking them out! 🌞 You are my sunshine. ~Judith Allen Shone

For Alzheimer’s, Vascular Dementia, COPD and anxiety spouse-caregiving stories, learn about these two books, Accepting the Gift of Caregiving series.

Available to order in paperback, eBook or hardcover from local booksellers, or
online from your favorite site, or Amazon, or Facebook shop 
or caregiver-books. Or in Halton area of Ontario, order from:

Alzheimer Society Halton
4391 Harvester Rd
Burlington, Ontario
289-837-2310

A Different Drummer Books
513 Locust Street
Burlington, Ontario
905-639-0925
diffdrum@mac.com